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What to see in Pamukkale

What to see in Pamukkale

It’s little wonder that Pamukkale is a must-see destination for travellers on a tour of Turkey as there are many diverse sights to explore in and around the town. The ‘Cotton Castle’ of travertine pools are by far the most exciting thing to see in Pammukale. Bright blue pools of thermal water, suspended on the edge of Pamukkale cliff are open to visitors, who can walk and splash through the calcified terraces, although there is a strict no-shoe policy to protect the site from pollution and erosion. Be sure to wear your swimming gear as the higher level pools are perfect for enjoying a relaxing soak and taking in the spectacular views of the rural Denizli. Avoid the crowds by visiting first thing in the morning or late in the afternoon, and keep in mind that this region of Turkey can be surprisingly cold during the winter months, so the best time of year to visit is in the spring or autumn.

Once you’ve conquered the limestone cliffs of Pamukkale it’s time to explore the ancient city of Hierapolis. The Hierapolis Theatre is a good place to start and the breathtaking views across the ruined city and Pamukkale below are well worth the walk. Dating back to Romantimes, this two-tiered amphitheatre is remarkably well-preserved. You can even see the remains of a number of luxurious imperial viewing boxes, once frequented by the highest-ranking Romans. Be sure to leave time to explore the ancient streets of Hierapolis when you visit Pamukkale, as its atmospheric, collonaded streets paint a vivid picture of life in a Roman spa-town. Dating back to the 2nd-century BC, if you visit Hierapolis today you’ll see a number of ancient ruins including a necropolis, a Byzantine Church and the white marble Temple of Apollo, built upon the mysterious Plutonium, an underground cave that was once believed to be a gateway to the underworld. 

One of the most popular things to do in Pamukkale is to swim in the Antique Pool, once the heart of ancient Hierapolis. Today, constantly refreshed by an inflow of hot calcium-laden mineral water, this former Roman bath is the most popular place to enjoy Pamukkale’s thermal springs. Maintaining an average temperature of 36 degrees celsius, bathers can follow in the footsteps of Roman aristocrats as they float between submerged Roman columns whilst soothing their travel-weary muscles.

If the intriguing ruins of Hierapolis have left you curious to learn more, the on-site Hierapolis Museum is home to some of the original sites most valuable relics including decorative stone reliefs and statues. A wander through this small museum can really help to bring the ancient Hierapolis to life.

Finally, at the foot of the limestone cliffs and travertine pools, charming Pamukkale Village is where you’ll find a good array of accommodation options, traditional Turkish restaurants and tourist-friendly cafes, bars and souvenir shops. Spending an afternoon strolling through its Natural Park or boating on the lake against the backdrop of the ‘Cotton Castle’ is a great way to obtain a different perspective of the glistening white pools.

Pamukkale Thermal Pools

Pamukkale Thermal Pools

Swimming in Cleopatra’s Pool

If you are visiting Pamukkale and want to enjoy a relaxing swim amongst Roman ruins in the famous Hierapolis hot springs, the Antique Pool is a modern spa complex with a thermal pool that is open to the public. The pool is surrounded by lush greenery and in it are marble columns, capitals, and plinths that are believed to have fallen from the nearby Temple of Apollo during an earthquake, making this a sacred pool. Mineral-rich freshwater is constantly pumped in and the water felt warm to touch.

 

How can I see the Pamukkale in one day?

How can I see the Pamukkale in one day?

Turkey’s most well-known tourist attraction has been enticing travelers to visit for centuries, despite the fact that it is little known outside the country. Pamukkale’s sparkling white travertine terraces are stunning and empty at the right time of day. Pick the wrong time and a mass of sweaty sunburnedistan speedo clad bodies awaits you. This UNESCO World Heritage site is a spectacular sight, but you will need to plan your visit in order to avoid the crowds. Pamukkale charms more than 2 million visitors each year, so in this Visit Pamukkale guide we aim to help you plan to visit when most of them aren’t there!

The geological phenomenon of the Pamukkale travertine terraces is by no means unique. You’ll find terraces and the pool that they contain the world over, Huanglong National Park, China and Mammoth Hot Springs in the USA are two examples. However, combine your visit with the preserved ruins of the Greco-Roman Spa City of Hierapolis, which is also included in the Pamukkale ticket price and you’ll appreciate it all the more.

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